PULP & PAPER NEWS
June 18, 2019

APRIL preventing extinction of Sumatran tiger



JAKARTA (foresthints.news) - The Kampar Peninsula landscape - situated in Riau’s Sungai Siak-Sungai Kampar peat hydrological unit and covering more than 720,000 hectares, or equivalent to more than 9 times the size of New York - effectively remains one of Indonesia’s last havens for critically-endangered Sumatran tigers.

According to IUCN data, analyzed by the foresthints.news team, almost 70% of the landscape, equivalent to more than 6 times the size of New York, is classified as habitat of the Sumatran tiger.

recently-published report on peat subsidence and forest landscape in the Kampar Peninsula backed by Indonesia’s second largest pulp and paper producer APRIL concluded, among other things, that the peat areas drained by APRIL’s supply chain only affected 300 meters into adjacent peat forests.

If this conclusion is accurate, with reference to land cover data published by the Indonesian forestry authorities (2018), this means that there is still the equivalent of around 315,000 soccer fields of relatively intact peat forests in the landscape which are still serving as an effective home to the Sumatran tiger.

In other words, there remains an area 4 times the size of New York consisting of relatively intact forests in the Kampar Peninsula landscape, an extensive part of which has been classified by the IUCN as Sumatran tiger habitat.

This forest cover situation almost entirely still exists today, as evidenced by a satellite data analysis by the foresthints.news team.

The first map below shows the Sumatran tiger’s habitat (yellow areas) spanning an area over 6 times the size of New York in the Kampar Peninsula landscape (black areas). 

The second map depicts existing relatively intact peat forests covering an area 4 times the size of New York comprising Sumatran tiger habitat (green areas) in the Kampar Peninsula landscape. 

APRIL’s ongoing impacts

The fact is that almost 75% of remaining relatively intact peat forests made up of Sumatran tiger habitat in the Kampar Peninsula landscape lie in APRIL-controlled concessions and its supply chains.

This means that the pulp giant is having the greatest impact in ensuring that Sumatran tigers in the landscape do not go extinct. 

The remaining relatively intact peat forests found in the supply chain of the APRIL-controlled pulpwood concessions originate from areas set aside for conservation purposes as well as from its four restoration concessions.

However, looking back, APRIL’s supply chain also had the largest impact in draining the Kampar Peninsula landscape classified as Sumatran tiger habitat for pulpwood plantation development, affecting an area almost 1.4 times the size of New York.

The aforementioned recent APRIL-backed research report warned that Indonesian peatlands in low lying regions, including the Kampar Peninsula landscape, continue to be seriously threatened by subsidence due to long-term peat drainage practices.

Nevertheless, it needs to be reemphasized that the remaining relatively intact peat forests in the landscape, most of which have been classified by the IUCN as Sumatran tiger habitat and nearly 75% of which are controlled by APRIL, are vast - 4 times the size of New York.

Given the critical importance of the remaining relatively intact peat forests in the Kampar Peninsula landscape as a habitat for the Sumatran tiger, ongoing efforts to ensure the survival of this critically-endangered species are wholly appreciated.


            

MORE NEWS